MADISON, WIS. -- A federal grand jury in the Western District of Wisconsin, sitting in Madison, returned the following indictments yesterday.  You are advised that a charge is merely an accusation and that a defendant is presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty.

Madison Man Charged with Distributing Heroin

Anthony Nance, 29, Madison, Wisconsin, is charged with four counts of distributing heroin and two counts of possessing heroin with the intent to distribute.  The indictment alleges that he committed these offenses in April and June 2019.  One of the counts alleges that he possessed 100 grams or more of heroin, and one count alleges he possessed 500 grams or more of heroin.

If convicted, Nance faces a mandatory minimum five years to a maximum of 40 years in federal prison on the counts alleging 100 grams and 500 grams or more of heroin, and 20 years on the other four counts.

The charges against him are the result of an investigation by the Dane County Narcotics Task Force.  Assistant U.S. Attorney Aaron Wegner is handling the prosecution.

La Crosse Man Charged with Distributing Heroin

David Wims, 40, La Crosse, Wisconsin, is charged with distributing heroin and with possessing heroin with intent to distribute.  The indictment alleges that he distributed heroin on May 9, 2019, and he possessed heroin with intent to distribute on June 5, 2019.

If convicted, Wims faces a maximum penalty of 20 years in federal prison on each count.  The charges against him are the result of an investigation by the La Crosse Police Department and Wisconsin Department of Justice Division of Criminal Investigation.  Assistant U.S. Attorney Diane Schlipper is handling the prosecution.

Madison Man Charged with Gun Crimes

Travis L. Hicks, 24, Madison, Wisconsin, is charged with two counts of being a felon in possession of a firearm.  The indictment alleges that on from January 21 to January 22, 2019, he possessed a 7.62 caliber firearm, and from January 22, 2019 to March 5, 2019, he possessed a 9mm pistol.

If convicted, Hicks faces a maximum penalty of 10 years in federal prison on each charge.  The charges against him are the result of an investigation by the Madison Police Department and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.  Assistant U.S. Attorney Corey Stephan is handling the prosecution.
 
Eau Claire Man Charged with Illegally Possessing a Firearm

Lamont Davis, 30, Eau Claire, Wisconsin, is charged with being a felon in possession of a firearm.  The indictment alleges that on July 3, 2019, he possessed a 9mm pistol.

If convicted, Davis faces a maximum penalty of 10 years in federal prison.  The charge against him are the result of an investigation by the Eau Claire Police Department and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.  Assistant U.S. Attorney Julie Pfluger is handling the prosecution.

Tomah Man Charged with Being a Felon in Possession of a Loaded Firearm

Isaac Morales, 43, Tomah, Wisconsin, is charged with being a felon in possession of a firearm.  The indictment alleges that on February 15, 2019, he possessed a loaded 9mm pistol and 9mm ammunition.

If convicted, Morales faces a maximum penalty of 10 years in federal prison.  The charge against him are the result of an investigation by the Monroe County Sheriff’s Office and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.  Assistant U.S. Attorney Rita Rumbelow is handling the prosecution.

Madison Man Charged with Illegally Possessing a Firearm

Malcolm Whiteside, 27, Madison, Wisconsin, is charged with being a felon in possession of a firearm.  The indictment alleges that on July 9, 2019, he possessed a 9mm handgun.

If convicted, Whiteside faces a maximum penalty of 10 years in federal prison.  The charge against him are the result of an investigation by the Madison Police Department and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.  Assistant U.S. Attorney Rita Rumbelow is handling the prosecution.

The indictment against Hicks, Davis, Morales, and Whiteside have been brought as part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), the U.S. Justice Department’s program to reduce violent crime.  The PSN approach emphasizes coordination between state and federal prosecutors and all levels of law enforcement to address gun crime, especially felons illegally possessing firearms and ammunition, and violent crimes and drug crimes that involve the use of firearms.


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