Press Release

MADISON -- Gov. Evers today signed Senate Bill 24, now 2021 Wisconsin Act 72, also known as “Ethan’s Law.”

This bill makes several changes to expand the circumstances that generally prohibit a court from placing a child in an out-of-home placement with a person who has previously been convicted of, has pleaded no contest to, or has had a charge dismissed or amended as a result of a plea agreement for certain crimes against a child, as well as to prohibit licensed entities from employing, contracting with, or housing any person or employee that has been charged with certain crimes against a child.

"Ethan's Law" is named in memory of 7-year-old Ethan Hauschultz. Ethan was tragically fatally beaten in 2018 after having been placed in the home of a distant relative in Manitowoc County who had previously pleaded no contest to a felony child abuse charge. The governor was joined today by Ethan's family at a private signing ceremony.

“No kid should ever have to experience what Ethan went through,” said Gov. Evers. “This bill is an important step& in helping protect our kids, keep them safe, and ensure that every kid has the opportunity to lead a happy, healthy life.”

Senate Bill 24, now 2021 Wisconsin Act 72:

  • Expands the circumstances in which a court is generally prohibited from out-of-home placement of a child with a person who has previously been convicted of, has pleaded no contest to, or has had a charge dismissed or amended as a result of a plea agreement for certain crimes against a child; and
  • Prohibits licensed entities from employing, contracting with, or housing any person or employee that has been charged with certain crimes against a child.

 

In addition to Senate Bill 24, Gov. Evers also signed Senate Bill 160, now 2021 Wisconsin Act 73.

Senate Bill 160, now 2021 Wisconsin Act 73:

  • Requires insurers and other persons regulated by the Office of the Commissioner of Insurance to conduct a risk assessment of any reasonably foreseeable threats, develop an information security program, and report cybersecurity events to protect nonpublic information in their possession that can be used to materially harm a Wisconsin resident.

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