MADISON – Governor Scott Walker signed eight bills relating to crime prevention and victim protection into law today at Mount Pleasant Lakeside COP House. The bills, among other actions, tighten restrictions on convicted drunk drivers, increase punishments for patronizing prostitutes, and criminalize soliciting sexually explicit material from minors.

“Public safety is one of our highest priorities, especially when it comes to protecting vulnerable groups like children and human trafficking victims,” said Governor Walker. “That’s why we’re enacting these commonsense reforms that take a firm stand against crime and keep our communities safe.”



Assembly Bill 98 – This bill requires that any driver requiring an interlock device cannot drive a vehicle that is not equipped with the device from the time of conviction until the order expires. Additionally, if a person violates the Interlock Ignition Device (IID) operating privilege restriction, the court must extend the IID operating privilege restriction by six months for each violation. Authored by Senator Alberta Darling (R—River Hills) and Representative Jim Ott (R—Mequon), the bill passed the Senate on a voice vote and was concurred in the Assembly on a voice vote. It is Act 124.

Assembly Bill 138 – This bill allows the Department of Transportation to award grants covering the costs of advertising a safe-ride service, in addition to providing grants covering the costs of the safe ride service itself. Authored by Senator Patrick Testin (R—Stevens Point) and Representative Treig Pronschinske (R—Mondovi), the bill passed the Senate on a voice vote and was concurred in the Assembly on a voice vote. It is Act 125.

Senate Bill 202 – This bill prohibits an adult from allowing underage drinking on property the adult owns and occupies or property the adult occupies and controls. Authored by Senator Van Wanggaard (R—Racine) and Representative Andre Jacque (R—De Pere), the bill passed the Senate on a voice vote and was concurred in the Assembly on a voice vote. It is Act 126.

Assembly Bill 390 – This bill provides that a person's knowledge that his or her operating privilege is revoked is not an element of the offense of operating after revocation (OAR). Authored by Senator Van Wanggaard (R—Racine) and Representative Andre Jacque (R—De Pere), the bill passed the Senate on a voice vote and was concurred in the Assembly on a voice vote. It is Act 127.

Senate Bill 396 - This bill adds a separate penalty for patronizing a child prostitute under the age of 18.  Under the bill, the penalty for patronizing a child is a Class G felony, which carries a maximum sentence of 10 years and/or a fine of $25,000. Authored by Senator Devin LeMahieu (R—Oostburg) and Representative Joel Kleefisch (R—Oconomowoc), the bill passed the Senate on a voice vote and was concurred in the Assembly on a voice vote. It is Act 128.

Senate Bill 300 - The bill makes it a crime for individuals to solicit sexually explicit material from underaged individuals. If an individual solicits sexually explicit material and believes the person is under 18, the individual is generally guilty of a Class I felony, which carries a penalty of 3.5 years imprisonment and/or a fine up to $10,000. Authored by Senator Van Wanggaard (R—Racine) and Representative Andre Jacque (R—De Pere), the bill passed the Senate on a voice vote and was concurred in the Assembly on a voice vote. It is Act 129.

Senate Bill 253 – This bill clarifies that it is immoral conduct for a department-licensed individual to assist a school employee, contractor or agent to obtain a new job in a school or school district if the licensed individual knows or has reasonable suspicion to believe the job seeker committed a sex offense against a student or a minor. Authored by Senator Luther Olsen (R—Ripon) and Representative Cindi Duchow (R—Town of Delafield), the bill passed the Senate on a voice vote and was concurred in the Assembly on a voice vote. It is Act 130.

Senate Bill 308 - The bill increases the penalty for patronizing a prostitute to a Class I felony for persons convicted of a third or subsequent violation. A Class I felony has a maximum sentence of three years and six months, a fine up to $10,000 or both. Authored by Senator Dan Feyen (R—Fond du Lac) and Representative Joel Kleefisch (R—Oconomowoc), the bill passed the Senate on a voice vote and was concurred in the Assembly on a voice vote. It is Act 131.



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